All Documents from Fathers of the Church
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Year
Issued
Latin Title
English Translation
SubjecteBook Link
180Against Heresies (Book 1)
"Against Heresies"
"Adversus Haereses" is a five-volume work written by St. Irenaeus in the 2nd century to refute the teachings of various Gnostic groups. In it Irenaeus identifies and describes several schools of Gnosticism and contrasts their beliefs with what he describes as catholic (universal), orthodox Christianity.

Book 1 - Irenaeus lays out the philosophies of the current day heresies.

180Against Heresies (Book 2)
"Against Heresies"
Responses to heretical positions.
180Against Heresies (Book 3)
"Against Heresies"
Further proof and testimony against heresy.
180Against Heresies (Book 4)
"Against Heresies"
Pronouncements of sound doctrine.
180Against Heresies (Book 5)
"Against Heresies"
Further pronouncements of sound doctrine.
378De Fide
"Of Faith"
The object of this document is to prove the Divinity of Jesus Christ, and His co-eternity, co-equality, and consubstantiality, as God the Son, with God the Father. This Ambrose does by constant appeal to the Scriptures, both of the Old and of the New Testament, which the Arians had in many cases forced into the mould of false interpretation to make them fit their doctrine.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 1)
"City of God"
This series of books was written in response to allegations at the time (426AD) that Christianity brought about the decline of Rome and is considered one of Augustine's most important works. The City of God is a cornerstone of Western Christian thought, touching on many topics still considered controversial; such as the suffering of the righteous, the existence of evil, the conflict between free will and divine omniscience, and the doctrine of original sin.

Book 1: Augustine's criticism of the pagans who attribute the sack of Rome to Christianity despite the fact that many were saved due to taking refuge in Christian churches. The book also explains good and bad things happen to righteous and wicked people alike, and it consoles the women violated in the recent calamity.

426De Civitate Dei (Book 2)
"City of God"
Saint Augustine's testimony of the fact that Rome suffered the greatest calamity of all due to the worship of the pagan gods, and with it, moral corruption.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 3)
"City of God"
Augustine describes how the pagan gods failed to save Rome numerous times in the past from worldly disasters, such as the sack of Rome by the Gauls.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 4)
"City of God"
Augustine's explanations as to the fact that the power and long duration of the Roman empire was due not to the pagan Gods but to the Christian God..
426De Civitate Dei (Book 5)
"City of God"
Augustine's refutation of the doctrine of fate and an explanation of the Christian doctrine of free will and its consistency with God's omniscience. Augustine attempts to show that Rome's dominion was due to the virtue of the Romans and explains the true happiness of the Christian emperors.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 6)
"City of God"
Augstine's refutation of the assertion that the pagan gods are to be worshiped for eternal life (rather than temporal benefits). Augustine claimed that even the esteemed pagan theologist Varro held the gods in contempt.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 7)
"City of God"
A demonstration that eternal life is not granted by Janus, Jupiter, Saturn, nor any other "select" gods.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 8)
"City of God"
An argument against the Platonists and their natural theology, which Augustine views as the closest approximation of Christian truth, and a refutation of Apuleius' insistence of the worship of demons as mediators between God and man.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 9)
"City of God"
A proof that all demons are evil and that only Christ can provide man with eternal happiness.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 10)
"City of God"
A teaching that the good angels wish that God alone is worshiped and a proof that no sacrifice can lead to purification except that of Christ.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 11)
"City of God"
The origins of the two cities from the separation of the good and bad angels, and a detailed analysis of Genesis 1.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 12)
"City of God"
Answers to why some angels are good and others bad, and a close examination of the creation of man.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 13)
"City of God"
Augustine's explanation and description of the fall of man and the incurring of death as a penalty for sin.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 14)
"City of God"
Augustine's teachings on the original sin as the cause for future lust and shame as a just punishment for lust.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 15)
"City of God"
Augustine's analysis of the events in Genesis between the time of Cain and Abel to the time of the flood.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 16)
"City of God"
Augustine continues his analysis of biblical history with the progress of the two cities from Noah to Abraham, and the progress of the heavenly city from Abraham to the kings of Israel.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 17)
"City of God"
Continuing with the history of the city of God from Samuel to David and to Christ, and Christological interpretations of the prophecies in Kings and Psalms.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 18)
"City of God"
Augustine discusses the parallel history of the earthly and heavenly cities from Abraham to the end, and interpretations of the prophecies of Christ in the prophetic books.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 19)
"City of God"
Augustine discusses the end of the two cities; both earthly and heavenly. He describes the vain attempt by modern day philosophers to make a happiness for themselves in this life (which he refutes) while describing the peace to be found both in this life and the next for the people of Christ.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 20)
"City of God"
The prophecies of the Last Judgment in the Old and New Testaments.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 21)
"City of God"
A discussion of the end reserved for the city of the devil, including the eternal punishment that awaits the damned.
426De Civitate Dei (Book 22)
"City of God"
Augustine's final book examines the end of the City of God, including the eternal happiness of the saints, the truths behind the resurrection of the body, and how the saints are to be used in God's final plans.
419De Nuptiis et Concupiscentia
"On Marriage and Concupiscence"
Augustine touches on numerous issues relative to sexuality, fidelity, and living in a morally upright manner, especially as it relates to the married state of life.
426On Grace and Free Will
"On Grace & Free Will"
This treatise was written by Augustine primarily to address the growing heresy of Pelagianism , which wrongly professed the belief that original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without special Divine aid.
417De Trinitate (Book1)
"Of The Trinity"
Augustine dives deep in to the knowledge and understanding of the Most Holy Trinity in this series of books.

Book 1:The unity and equality of the supreme Trinity is established from the sacred Scriptures, and some texts alleged against the equality of the Son are explained.

417De Trinitate (Book2)
"Of The Trinity"
Augustine pursues his defense of the equality of the Trinity; and in treating of the sending of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and of the various appearances of God, demonstrates that He who is sent is not therefore less than He who sends, because the one has sent, the other has been sent; but that the Trinity, being in all things equal, and alike in its own nature unchangeable and invisible and omnipresent, works indivisibly in each sending or appearance.
417De Trinitate (Book3)
"Of The Trinity"
The question is discussed with respect to the appearances of God spoken of in the previous book, which were made under bodily forms, whether only a creature was formed, for the purpose of manifesting God to human sight in such way as He at each time judged fitting; or whether angels, already existing, were so sent as to speak in the person of God; and this, either by assuming a bodily appearance from the bodily creature, or by changing their own bodies into whatever forms they would, suitable to the particular action, according to the power given to them by the Creator; while the essence itself of God was never seen in itself.
417De Trinitate (Book4)
"Of The Trinity"
Explains for what reason the Son of God was sent; that by Christ’s dying for sinners, we were to be convinced how great is God’s love for us, and also what manner of men we are whom He loved. That the Word came in the flesh, to the purpose also of enabling us to be so cleansed as to contemplate and cleave to God. That all are gathered together from many into one by the one Mediator of life; Christ, through Whom alone is wrought the true cleansing of the soul. Further it is demonstrated that the Son of God, although made less by being sent, on account of the form of a servant which He took, is not therefore less than the Father according to the form of God, because He was sent by Himself: and that the same account is to be given of the sending of the Holy Spirit.
417De Trinitate (Book5)
"Of The Trinity"
Proceeds to treat of the arguments put forward by the heretics, not from Scripture, but from their own reason. Those are refuted, who think the substance of the Father and of the Son to be not the same, because everything predicated of God is, in their opinion, predicated of Him according to substance; and therefore it follows, that to beget and to be begotten, or to be begotten and unbegotten, being diverse, are diverse substances; whereas it is here demonstrated that not everything predicated of God is predicated according to substance, in such manner as He is called good and great according to substance, or anything else that is predicated of Him in respect to Himself; but that some things are also predicated of Him relatively, i.e. not in respect to Himself, but to something not Himself, as He is called Father in respect to the Son, and Lord in respect to the creature that serveth Him; in which case, if anything thus predicated relatively, i.e. in respect to something not Himself, is even predicated as happening in time, as e.g. “Lord, thou hast become our refuge,” yet nothing happens to God so as to work a change in Him, but He Himself remains absolutely unchangeable in His own nature or essence.
417De Trinitate (Book6)
"Of The Trinity"
The question is proposed, how the apostle calls Christ “the power of God, and the wisdom of God.” And an argument is raised, whether the Father is not wisdom Himself, but only the Father of wisdom; or whether Wisdom begat Wisdom. But the answer to this is deferred for a little, while the unity and equality of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, are proved; and that we ought to believe in a Trinity, not in a threefold (triplicem) god. Lastly, that saying of Hilary is explained, eternity in the Father, appearance in the image, use in the gift.
417De Trinitate (Book7)
"Of The Trinity"
Augustine resolves the question he had deferred, and teaches us that the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit is one power and one wisdom, no otherwise than one God and one essence. And he then inquires how it is that, in speaking of God, the Latins say, One essence, three persons; but the Greeks, One essence, three substances or hypostases.
417De Trinitate (Book8)
"Of The Trinity"
Explains and proves that not only the Father is not greater than the Son, but neither are both together anything greater than the Holy Spirit, nor any two together in the same trinity anything greater than one, nor all three together anything greater than each severally. It is then shown how the nature itself of God may be understood from our understanding of truth, and from our knowledge of the supreme good, and from the innate love of righteousness, whereby a righteous soul is loved even by a soul that is itself not yet righteous. But it is urged above all, that the knowledge of God is to be sought by love, which God is said to be in the Scriptures; and in this love is also pointed out the existence of some trace of a trinity.
417De Trinitate (Book9)
"Of The Trinity"
That a kind of trinity exists in man, who is the image of God, viz. the mind, and the knowledge wherewith the mind knows itself, and the love wherewith it loves both itself and its own knowledge; and these three are shown to be mutually equal, and of one essence.
417De Trinitate (Book10)
"Of The Trinity"
In which there is shown to be another trinity in the mind of man, and one that appears much more evidently, viz. in his memory, understanding, and will.
417De Trinitate (Book11)
"Of The Trinity"
A kind of image of the Trinity is pointed out, even in the outer man; first of all, in those things which are perceived from without, viz. in the bodily object that is seen, and in the form that is impressed by it upon the sight of the seer, and in the purpose of the will that combines the two; although these three are neither mutually equal, nor of one substance. Next, a kind of trinity, in three somewhats of one substance, is observed to exist in the mind itself, as it were introduced there from those things that are perceived from without; viz. the image of the bodily object which is in the memory, and the impression formed therefrom when the mind’s eye of the thinker is turned to it, and the purpose of the will combining both. And this latter trinity is also said to pertain to the outer man, in that it is introduced into the mind from bodily objects, which are perceived from without.
417De Trinitate (Book12)
"Of The Trinity"
Commencing with a distinction between wisdom and knowledge, points out a kind of trinity, of a peculiar sort, in that which is properly called knowledge, and which is the lower of the two; and this trinity, although it certainly pertains to the inner man, is still not yet to be called or thought an image of God.
417De Trinitate (Book13)
"Of The Trinity"
Augustine expounds this trinity that he has found in knowledge by commending Christian faith.
417De Trinitate (Book14)
"Of The Trinity"
The true wisdom of man is treated of; and it is shown that the image of God, which man is in respect to his mind, is not placed properly in transitory things, as in memory, understanding, and love, whether of faith itself as existing in time, or even of the mind as busied with itself, but in things that are permanent; and that this wisdom is then perfected, when the mind is renewed in the knowledge of God, according to the image of Him who created man after His own Image, and thus attains to wisdom, wherein that which is contemplated is eternal.
417De Trinitate (Book15)
"Of The Trinity"
Begins by setting forth briefly and in sum the contents of the previous fourteen books. The argument is then shown to have reached so far as to allow of our now inquiring concerning the Trinity, which is God, in those eternal, incorporeal, and unchangeable things themselves, in the perfect contemplation of which a blessed life is promised to us. But this Trinity, as he shows, is here seen by us as by a mirror and in an enigma, in that it is seen by means of the image of God, which we are, as in a likeness that is obscure and hard of discernment. In like manner, it is shown, that some kind of conjecture and explanation may be gathered respecting the generation of the divine Word, from the word of our own mind, but only with difficulty, on account of the exceeding disparity which is discernible between the two words; and, again, respecting the procession of the Holy Spirit, from the love that is joined thereto by the will.
1265Summa Theologica - The One God
"The Highest Study of God"
The Summa Theologica was intended as an instructional guide for moderate theologians and a compendium of all of the main theological teachings of the Catholic Church. It presents the reasoning for almost all points of Christian theology in the West. Treatise on the one God deals exclusively with the essence and attributes of God.
1265Summa Theologica - Most Holy Trinity
"The Highest Study of God"
The Summa Theologica was intended as an instructional guide for moderate theologians and a compendium of all of the main theological teachings of the Catholic Church. It presents the reasoning for almost all points of Christian theology in the West. Treatise on The Most Holy Trinity deals in great detail the truth of the Triune God and how it can be understood by human beings.
1265Summa Theologica - On the Creation
"The Highest Study of God"
The Summa Theologica was intended as an instructional guide for moderate theologians and a compendium of all of the main theological teachings of the Catholic Church. It presents the reasoning for almost all points of Christian theology in the West. Treatise on the Creation deals with God's act of creation including all visible and invisible objects.
1265Summa Theologica - On Man
"The Highest Study of God"
The Summa Theologica was intended as an instructional guide for moderate theologians and a compendium of all of the main theological teachings of the Catholic Church. It presents the reasoning for almost all points of Christian theology in the West. Treatise on Man analyzes the human being in relation to everything else God has created.
1265Summa Theologica - Work of Six Days
"The Highest Study of God"
The Summa Theologica was intended as an instructional guide for moderate theologians and a compendium of all of the main theological teachings of the Catholic Church. It presents the reasoning for almost all points of Christian theology in the West. Treatise on the Work of the Six Days provides a deep insight in to the initial act of creation by God.
1265Summa Theologica - Government of Creatures
"The Highest Study of God"
The Summa Theologica was intended as an instructional guide for moderate theologians and a compendium of all of the main theological teachings of the Catholic Church. It presents the reasoning for almost all points of Christian theology in the West. Treatise on The Conservation and Government of Creatures is an in-depth examination at God's dealings and providence over all created creatures.
1265Summa Theologica - Sacred Doctrine
"The Highest Study of God"
The Summa Theologica was intended as an instructional guide for moderate theologians and a compendium of all of the main theological teachings of the Catholic Church. It presents the reasoning for almost all points of Christian theology in the West. Treatise on Sacred Doctrine examines the extent of Revelation as it relates to Sacred Scripture.
1265Summa Theologica - On the Angels
"The Highest Study of God"
The Summa Theologica was intended as an instructional guide for moderate theologians and a compendium of all of the main theological teachings of the Catholic Church. It presents the reasoning for almost all points of Christian theology in the West. Treatise on the Angels deals with the created spirits whom God created before human beings.
1619Introduction to the Devout Life
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A masterpiece in assisting the faithful trying to attain the highest levels of holiness and sanctity.